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photo article lectures été 2019

La Chambre's reading - Summer 2019


"Travelling is reading" and according to Hugo, the opposite is also true. Maybe that's why we always find a book in our suitcases. And even if you have no other destination than your bed, your square meter balcony or the park next door, the road opens on paper. Our selection lets you choose the direction. 

THE BOOK ABOUT THE POWER OF WORDS 

Jean McClellan lives in the United States. A doctor of neuroscience, she studies aphasia, a language disorder, and has devoted her career to restoring speech to those who have lost it. But since the arrival in power of a new fundamentalist government, she has been almost silenced. And with her, all the women of the country. A word counter on their wrists forbids them to say more than 100 words a day with electric shocks. A prison of virtual silence from which Jean does not know how to escape, until she is called to help the brother of the new president, who is the victim of an attack. The lines of Vox are read in relief, in a context where women's voices are being freed, and remind us of the fragility of our fundamental rights. Vox by Christina Dalcher. 

THE BOOK THAT TELLS FOUR SUMMERS AND MORE 

It's summer in the Moselle in the 90s. The steel crisis continues, the industry dies out in the Fensch Valley as Anthony, Steph, Simon, Hacine and Coralie enter their teens. They all dream of leaving the region, of setting out to meet a destiny greater than that promised to their class. In 1992, 1994, 1996 and 1998, we follow their summers, their dreams, their loves, their disillusions. Awarded the Goncourt Prize in 2018, Their children after them is a social criticism, a story where season awakens hopes but does not always realize them. Their children after them by Nicolas Mathieu 

THE BOOK WE'RE FINALLY GOING TO FINISH 

Research has been waiting for years on our bedside table. Maybe she was there before us, in our parents' library, who devoured her. All of it. So this summer, we're going to read Proust, too. And we won't regret it. That said, seven volumes is ambitious. But there's no way we're giving up on this again. We at least finish On the side of Swann before school starts. If the holidays go by too fast, good news: there are 11 months left in the year to go further. On the side of Swann by Marcel Proust 

THE BOOK THAT MAKES US WANT TO DISCONNECT 

Nine seconds. This is the average attention span of those who have grown eyes on a screen, according to a study by Google engineers. Not much more than the 8 seconds of attention a goldfish can show. With his essay, Bruno Patino questions the promises of the digital age and its side effects. In an economy of attention where addictive immediacy overrides reflection, letting go of your smartphone and opening this book is already taking back control of your time. And it's highly recommended, not just this summer. The goldfish civilization by Bruno Patino 

THE BOOK THAT WE DIDN'T WANT TO READ WHEN EVERYONE WAS READING IT (BUT WE STILL WANTED TO READ IT VERY MUCH) 

Did it feel the same to you, too? Late 2018, Become of Michelle Obama arrives on bookstore shelves around the world. We've read some excerpts. We followed the interview of its author by Oprah Winfrey. We know her cover by heart: a photo of her smiling, chin on her right hand. Now that the wave has passed, we take advantage of the summer to immerse ourselves in the memories of the former first lady of the United States, from her childhood in Chicago to the backstage of her husband's presidency. The common thread is the fighting spirit that it took to make a place for oneself as a black woman in a world dominated by white men. Become of Michelle Obama 

THE BOOK THAT INVITES US TO LITERARY MEETINGS FOR TWO PEOPLE 

Founded in Paris in 1953, The Paris Review collects the treasures of English-language literature and the words of those who write them. In Writers at Work Around the WorldThe magazine's editors, Emily Nemens, selected from the magazine's archives, give long interviews with Jorge Luis Borges, Haruki Murakami and Nadine Gordimer. Their backgrounds, their views on literature, their writing habits... Every conversation takes us behind the scenes of their works. A limited edition to read in English, to revise your basics or to travel from page to page. Writers at work around the world from The Paris Review 

THE BOOK THAT WE READ AGAIN BECAUSE IT'S SUMMER 

The summer of 1954 begins on the shores of the Mediterranean. Cécile, 17 years old, has just missed her baccalaureate and is spending the holidays in the villa of her father, Raymond, widowed for 15 years. Elsa, her father's mistress, is also invited. Days at the beach and social pleasures are on the program, until the arrival of Anne, a friend of Cecile's mother. Hello sadness is made up of ambiguities, so vivid in adolescence. This novel also marks the explosive beginning of Françoise Sagan's career, who describes it in these words: "I met fame at the age of 18, 188 pages, it was like a shot of firedamp. "Yes, we've already read it. So what's the big deal? Hello sadness by Françoise Sagan 

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